Diferencias relacionadas con la edad en el uso de la artroplastia total de hombro a través del tiempo: el uso y resultados / Age-related differences in the use of total shoulder arthroplasty over time: use and outcomes

securedownload - copia

Fuente
Este artículo es originalmente publicado en:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26430014?dopt=Abstract

http://www.bjj.boneandjoint.org.uk/content/97-B/10/1385.abstract
De:

Singh JA1, Ramachandran R1.

Bone Joint J. 2015 Oct;97-B(10):1385-9. doi: 10.1302/0301-620X.97B10.35696.
Todos los derechos reservados para:

©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

 

Abstract

We assessed the age-related differences in the use of total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and outcomes, and associated time-trends using the United States Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) between 1998 and 2010. Age was categorised as < 50, 50 to 64, 65 to 79 and ≥ 80 years. Time-trends in the use of TSA were compared using logistic regression or the Cochran Armitage test. The overall use of TSA increased from 2.96/100 000 in 1998 to 12.68/100 000 in 2010. Significantly lower rates were noted between 2009 and 2010, compared with between 1998 and 2000, for: mortality, 0.1% versus 0.2% (p = 0.004); discharge to an inpatient facility, 13.3% versus 14.5% (p = 0.039), and hospital stay > median, 29.4% versus 51.2% (p < 0.001). The rates of use of TSA/100 000 by age groups, < 50, 50 to 64, 65 to 79 and ≥ 80 years were: 0.32, 4.62, 17.82 and 12.56, respectively in 1998 (p < 0.001); and 0.65, 17.49, 75.27 and 49.05, respectively in 2010 (p < 0.001) with an increasing age-related difference over time (p < 0.001). Across the age categories, there were significant differences in the proportion: discharged to an inpatient facility, 3.2% versus 4.2% versus 14.7% versus 36.5%, respectively in 1998 (p < 0.001) and 1.8% versus 4.3% versus 12.5% versus 35.5%, respectively in 2010 (p < 0.001) and the proportion with hospital stay > median, 39.7% versus 40.2% versus 53% versus 69%, respectively in 1998 (p < 0.001) and 17.2% versus 20.6% versus 28.7% versus 50.7%, respectively in 2010 (p < 0.001). In a nationally representative sample, we noted a time-related increase in the use of TSA and increasing age-related differences in outcomes indicating a changing epidemiology of the use of TSA. Age-related differences in outcomes suggest that attention should focus on groups with the worst outcomes. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B:1385-9.

©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

KEYWORDS:

Age; discharge; elderly; hospital length of stay; mortality; outcomes; total shoulder arthroplasty; trends; use

PMID:26430014 [PubMed – in process]

 

Deja un comentario

Your email address will not be published.